Although we had some phenomenal sit-down meals, at Cervejaria Ramiro and Cervajeria Baleal, most of our eating in Lisbon, Portugal, experiences involved wandering around the seven hills (or at least a few of them) and eating standing up.  We ate several of our bifanas at O Trevo while standing.  We ate a lot on our feet. 

The bakeries, or pastelerias, in Portugal are different from those I associate with New Jersey or New York, where you go in, buy some bread or cookies and take them to go, hopefully in a white, cardboard box with red and white striped string.

The pastelerias also are not like cafes – do not look for many tables with people sitting inside, sipping coffee.  Some may have a few tables outside, but be careful if you sit there – they will charge you more to sit down.  Otherwise, eat and drink at the barra, standing, and do like the locals do in Lisbon.

Whether a bifana, soup, a quick beer, a coffee, or a pastry – we ate standing up.  In most countries, we stop for a coffee to watch the passersby and to rest our feet, but not so in Lisbon.  Eating in Lisbon is an active experience.

I enjoyed popping in and eating, particularly the pastries.  The pasties de nata became a quick favorite – a creme filled tart, flamed on the top.  Some of the best were at Folar de Chaves in Chiada.  

Eating in Lisbon

We had several other pastries that I have no name for:

Eating in Lisbon

A turnover with an entire apple inside

easting in Lisbon

A holeless donut type pastry with cinnamon 

Eating in Lisbon

Rice pudding with nutmeg.

Eating in Lisbon

And, it was not just the pastries that we ate standing up, but we drank standing up too – beer, wine and, Ginja, a cherry liquor, we saw Anthony Bourdain drinking on No Reservations.  

We checked out A Ginja, where Tony drank and also another Ginja shop place nearby that stayed open late.  We popped in for a small, white cup of cherry liquor, with liquor soaked cherries in the bottom.  We stood around in the street with our baby cup, chatting it up with different people.

All this, while standing.  

My feet needed a rest. . . .eating in Lisbon is exhausting!

Looking For Great Food and Wine Tours in Portugal?

Check out our recommendations for the best Portuguese food tours, cooking classes, and wine tours. With tours from Lisbon and Porto, these tours cover Alentejo, Minho, and everything in between.

And, for more Portuguese culinary travel inspiration, check out our Portugal food travel guide.

 TourDurationCity of DeparturePrice FromBook It!
Portugal Food Tours Wine & Cheese Tasting on a Luxury Sailing Yacht2.5 HoursLisbon$1000 Book Travel Now
Portugal Food and Wine Tours Private Tour of Douro Wineries and Vineyards10 HoursPorto$500 Book Travel Now
Portugal food and wine tours Private Wine Lovers Tour6 HoursLisbon$212 Book Travel Now
Portugal Food and Wine Tours Alentejo Food & Wine Tour8 HoursLisbon$188 Book Travel Now
Portugal food and wine tours Douro Valley Grape Harvest - Picking & Tasting10 HoursPorto$148 Book Travel Now
Portugal Food and Wine Tours Minho & Vinho Verde Gastronomic Tour & Tasting11 HoursPorto$136 Book Travel Now
Portugal food and wine tours Vinho Verde Wine Tour & Lunch11 HoursPorto$112 Book Travel Now
Portugal food and wine tours Portuguese Cooking Class, Dinner & Wine3.5 HoursLisbon$106 Book Travel Now
Portugal Food & Wine Tours Porto City Flavors Gastronomy TourFlexiblePorto$91 Book Travel Now
Portugal food and wine tours Lisbon Food Tour - Tapas and Wine3 HoursLisbon$69 Book Travel Now

*This post contains compensated links. Find more info in my DISCLAIMER.

For more tips on traveling Lisbon and exploring Portugal through food, check out our Portugal Food Travel Guide.

Check Out Some More Related Posts

Amber is a recovering attorney, yoga teacher, writer, social media consultant, and eater, traveling With Husband In Tow

Send this to a friend