As part of our initial city tour of Dubai, we made a quick pit stop to see the spice and gold souks. Pit stop was the appropriate word.  Having been through the spice market in Istanbul, I was not expecting something similar, but thought I could at least pick up some spices for our friends in London who we were on our way to see.  They love to cook, so I thought it would be perfect.

Our stop was quick, as the spice souk was really only one alley, with a bend in it.  I could have walked through in about 60 seconds, but I stopped to take photos along the way.

Dubai Spice Souk

Dubai Spice Souk As the case with many similar markets around the world, the size of the Dubai spice souk has become diminutive in direct proportion to the number of supermarkets and stores that are now available.  The Dubai spice souk in particular had an air of tourism – almost like it was merely established, or at least maintained, for the benefit of the tourists.  I could not clearly judge this fact, though, and also understand that much of the souks in Istanbul are touristy indeed.  There were some local Emerati walking nearby, through the covered market walkways, but none of them seemed to be stopping along with the tourists at the little shops.  

Dubai Spice Souk

Dubai Spice Souk Regardless of my lightening fast tour of the tiny Dubai spice souk, and my quick realization that I would probably make out better at the Tesco or Carrefour for spices, I managed to grab some decent photos.  In fact, I think the photos came out better than the experience.  There were some recognizable spices, as well as some things not even our tour guide knew.

Dubai Tourism hosted us for our tour of Dubai, but all of my opinions are my own. 

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