7 Scottish Foods You Must Eat in Edinburgh

7 Scottish Foods You Must Eat in Edinburgh

After a recent work trip to London, we trained on up to Edinburgh for another meeting. And, we were in need of a little city break. So, we stayed a few days more to explore, and eat in Edinburgh. I haven’t been to Edinburgh since 1993 (!) and Scotland is one of the countries I had been to, that Eric hadn’t. This seemed like a perfect chance for Eric to tick a new country off of his list. We love the food we eat living in Girona, but we miss traditional pub grub, like the kind we get when we visit Limerick, Ireland. We were in search of some traditional Scottish foods that we could put on our must eat in Edinburgh list! 7 Dishes You Must Eat in Edinburgh Now, I am not entirely sure how “Scottish” versus British a few of these dishes are. Some of them were on almost every pub menu we saw, regardless of origin. And, I will include some links to recommendations on where to find some of these dishes. I am not an expert on the restaurants in Edinburgh, but I did a lot of research on where to eat in Edinburgh, and most of these pubs were on every list I saw. That must be for a reason. Scotch Eggs You can’t get more Scottish than a dish that has Scotch in its title. I’ve always wanted to try a Scotch Egg. We managed to track one down our first evening in Edinburgh, where we managed to try 4 different dishes on our must eat in Edinburgh list. I loved the...
10 Best Pintxos in San Sebastian

10 Best Pintxos in San Sebastian

We traipsed all over San Sebastian, in and out of pintxos bars, to learn everything we possible could about the most well known, and least understood, Spanish cuisine. It was a sacrifice, trust me. By the end of our trip to San Sebastian I was so full all I wanted to do was crawl into bed. But, it was worth it to provide travelers to the Basque Country the 10 best pintxos in San Sebastian. Our List of the 10 Best Pintxos in San Sebastian Some of the following pintxos are definite must eats while touring San Sebastian. Others are the best pintxos we found, even if they weren’t the most traditional. These were the ones we returned for over and over, sometimes twice in one day. And, we had a little bit of help in creating our list of the 10 best pintxos. Some of these we tried during our Devour San Sebastian Pintxos and Wine Tour. Devour San Sebastian taught us all about how to eat, and order, the best pintxos in San Sebastian. Read what other travelers say about Devour San Sebastian here. Gilda – The Original Pintxo The original pintxos. The story is that a patron at Txeptexa liked the flavor of the snacks that were served at the bar. At the time, they included anchovies, pickled peppers, and olives. This patron liked them so much that he skewered them all together to try all the flavors in one bite. The term pintxo refers to the stick that was used to skewer the tasty treats. At Txepetxa, they’ve been offering the gilda every since, and...
What is Eataly World – Bringing Italian Food to The World

What is Eataly World – Bringing Italian Food to The World

When offered the opportunity to visit a self proclaimed food amusement park, you should always say yes. And, that is how we ended up visiting FICO Eataly World in its first week of operation. But, what is a food amusement park? And does FICO fit the bill? What is the Eataly Concept Eataly is a commercial concept where Italian food is offered online, and in speciality shops, from Manhattan to Sao Paolo to Seoul. It is the largest Italian marketplace in the world. The Eataly locations we’ve been to are essentially Italian food stores, normally with a restaurant or two inside.  We recommend the Eataly locations in Bologna and Forli in Emilia Romagna as great places to pick up some food souvenirs, and because the restaurants on site are carefully curated. They are Eataly outposts of some of the most traditional restaurants in those areas, including da Amerigo from Savigno, and Trattoria di Giuliana from Bagno.  It’s success is spawning some competitors, and rumor has it that Jose Andres and Ferran Adria are hoping to building something similar in New York to bring Spanish food to the world. What is FICO Eataly World But, FICO Eataly World takes the original Eataly concept and puts it on steroids. For travelers who have experienced Eataly in Italy, or in the States, this version has a familiar feel. You shop. You eat. You leave. For other travelers, FICO (which stands for Fabbrica Italiana Contadina) is intended as a way to bring the regional foods of Italy all under one roof. There is a bit of a nod to Emilia Romagna, the “hosting...
What to Eat in Mauritius

What to Eat in Mauritius

Before arriving in Mauritius, I really didn’t know much about the island, or it’s cuisine. I had made some assumptions (many of them wrong) but I was pleasantly surprised at the varied of foods to eat in Mauritius. Mauritius is a melting pot, with a unique combination of African, Indian, Chinese, French, and British influence. The Brits probably have the least direct influence on the cuisine, although tea is very popular. This melting pot influence means you can eat curry, dim sum, and a Chateaubriand all in one day. Or, some dishes combine the influence from these varied cuisines into one dish, a Creole inspired dish. We ate some of these dishes on a great Mauritian food tour, but others we were able to eat at our hotel, the Heritage Le Telfair, as well. It was a perfect mix of what to eat in Mauritius, from street food to luxury. Mauritian Curry Mauritian curry is just different enough from Indian curries to make it unique. Most common are fish curries, or chicken and prawn curries, spiced with cumin, coriander seeds, cardamom, ginger, and about a dozen other ingredients. The curries are sometimes spicy, but they seem to tone it down a bit for the tourists. I always asked for extra chilies and most times they provided me a unique chili paste. The Heritage Le Telfair made their chili paste in house, spiced with chilies, citrus, and vinegar. It was amazing, and white. I am used to seeing red or green chili paste. We learned to cook our own Mauritian Curry during a cooking class at the Heritage Le Telfair,...
8 Unforgettable Luxury Experiences in Costa Brava

8 Unforgettable Luxury Experiences in Costa Brava

Two years ago we happened upon Costa Brava, what we then termed the unknown culinary tourism corner of Europe. To be completely honest, we knew nothing about Costa Brava at the time. The only thing we knew was that the tourism board worked with bloggers, and for us, at that time, it was enough. Since then, we’ve spent enough time in Costa Brava that we decided to move to Girona! A lot of our decision was based on the food and wine, and some of the most unforgettable experiences in Costa Brava! What surprised me during this most recent visit was how many luxury experiences in Costa Brava there really are. I knew about the incredible gastronomy offerings, but we found so much more to experience during this last visit. Following the Michelin Star Trail One of the main reasons why we keep returning to Costa Brava is because of its food! Costa Brava is home to 14 Michelin Star restaurants. Now, this might not seem like a lot in comparison to Paris, New York, or Tokyo. But, when you consider the size of Costa Brava, and that it’s largest city is home to only about 100,000 people, it’s incredible. If you love food, and high gastronomy, then one of the most unforgettable experiences in Costa Brava is to follow the Michelin Star trail of restaurants that are sprinkled through the region. The Girona Teritori d’Estrelles, or Girona Land of Stars, is the perfect way to spend a holiday in Costa Brava. Eating. Is there any other way? Dining at El Celler Can Roca At least one of the...
How They Make Parma Ham in Emilia Romagna

How They Make Parma Ham in Emilia Romagna

When I started traveling to Italy, I always wondered how they actually make Parma Ham (and mortadella too!). When I walked around any small town in Italy I always saw large legs of ham hanging from the ceiling. More often than not, they were stamped with a crown shaped marking that bears a single word: “Parma.” But, how did they get there? What is Prosciutto di Parma Prosciutto di Parma, or more generally, Parma ham, has been around since Roman times. There are stories from 100 BC referencing the unique flavor of the air-dried pork from the area surrounding Parma. At the time, pork was dried to extend its life and prevent it from spoiling. A group of Parma ham producers created a Consortium, Consorzio del Prosciutto di Parma, in the 1970s, to control the quality of prosciutto. In 1996, the European Union gave the DOP designation on Prosciutto di Parma. Like all DOP and IGP products, the Consortium regulates the types of pigs that can be used, what the pigs are fed, and how the ham itself is produced. What Are The Ingredients in Parma Ham The Consortium likes to say there are only four ingredients in Parma ham: Italian pigs, salt, air, and time. In reality it’s really only two ingredients, although air and time are also key components. Parma ham is made by curing a leg of pork with nothing but sea salt. This increases the tenderness of the meat, and gives it a characteristic sweet flavor. The production process is overseen by a maestro salatore, or salt master, which has to be the coolest sounding...
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