The Famous Macau Pork Chop Bun – Best Pork Bun Macau

The Famous Macau Pork Chop Bun – Best Pork Bun Macau

My obsession with pork is by definition probably an unhealthy one. But when so many cultures around the world prepare pork in a variety of tasty ways, what’s one to do? Well, one goes on a pork pilgrimage to track down the famous Macau pork chop bun. The Macau pork bun is a sandwich we first tracked down in Malaysia, so finding the best pork chop bun Macau offers was top on our list of things to do in Macau. Fortunately, we’ve spent a lot of time in places like Thailand, Vietnam, Spain, and Italy over the years. These are all great countries able to satisfy my need for all things pork. Ribs, pork belly, jamon, prosciutto. The list goes on and on. One item on this porktastic list is also one of the most elusive: the famous Macau pork chop bun. The Macanese pork chop bun is something we had never heard of before traveling to Asia. What is the Macau Pork Bun? What is a Macau pork chop bun? Picture an oversized bone-in Macau pork chop, marinated to perfection in a combination of five spice powder, garlic, sugar, salt, soy, white, and black pepper. The pork chop bun Macau is fried to a golden brown and severed on a warm, buttered Portuguese bun. Hungry yet? Want one? The Macau pork chop bun recipe reminds me of the Portuguese bifana, which is not exactly a porkchop bun but is a similar pork sandwich. The Macau-style pork chop sandwich and the Portuguese bifana are two of my favorite pork sandwiches in the world. That’s saying something.  Prior to our visit to Macau,...
What is Dim Sum – Eating Dim Sum in Hong Kong

What is Dim Sum – Eating Dim Sum in Hong Kong

I remember the first time I experienced eating dim sum. For the longest time, I really had no idea what dim sum was. I remember a reference to dim sum in the movie Sleepless in Seattle but really had no clue what those two tasty words meant. Now, I feel like an expert on dim sum in Hong Kong, a mecca for the perfect meal of dumplings. But, for those uninitiated in this world, here we answer the question: What is dim sum? In this post, we talk about typical Cantonese dim sum dishes and answer the question how to do you eat dim sum. We also provide recommendations on where to eat dim sum in Hong Kong, including our favorite place for classic dim sum dishes as well as some options for higher-end versions of some of the most popular dim sum dishes. Eating Dim Sum   That first time we ate dim sum in Chinatown in Washington, DC, back in 2002, we had no idea how to eat dim sum. I merely just looked for dim sum near me, without thinking about what was the best dim sum, or traditional dim sum. We exited the Chinatown Metro and followed the crowds to a dim sum restaurant. We ended up at Tony Cheng’s dim sum Chinatown DC. We had no idea how to eat dim sum.  We looked around as carts wheeled by, pointing to some things that did not look scary (like the chicken feet, we avoided those), and we ordered a few dishes. Having no idea how much a plate of dumplings cost, we ordered maybe four...
Aceto Balsámico in Italy – Acetaia Pedroni di Modena & Osteria di Rubbiara

Aceto Balsámico in Italy – Acetaia Pedroni di Modena & Osteria di Rubbiara

Over our years traveling to Emilia Romagna, Italy, we’ve learned all about how they make Balsamico di Modena, the traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena. I now consider myself a bit of an expert on the process. One of our favorite places to visit also happens to be one of the most well-known producers of Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Modena DOP, Acetai Pedroni di Modena. In this post, I will talk about the history of Acetaia Pedroni Modena. I will also share how Aceto Balsamico tradizionale is made and what the difference is between Aceto Balsamico di Modena IGP and Aceto Balsamico Tradzionale di Modena DOP. Also, I will share what it’s like to eat as Osteria di Rubbiara, Pedroni’s historic restaurant in Nonantola. Learn more in our Emilia Romagna Food Guide – Every blog we’ve written about Emilia Romagna in one place What is Aceto Balsámico Di Modena The first step to understanding traditional balsamic, or Aceto di Modena, is to understand the production process. This is a very high level overview. There is a lot more detail in my book, The Food Traveler’s Guide to Emilia Romagna. In order to make traditional balsamic, grape juice is heated on a fire and cooked in open air for about 24 hours. About 100 kilograms of grapes are used to produce about 75 liters of liquid. After the heating process, only 35 liters remain. The reduced liquid is placed into a series of a minimum of five barrels, called a batteria. Over time the balsamico Modena is transferred from one barrel to another, from the largest to the smallest barrel. The increasingly smaller amounts are due...
Traditional Irish Brown Bread Recipe – How to Make Irish Brown Bread

Traditional Irish Brown Bread Recipe – How to Make Irish Brown Bread

We’ve been traveling to Ireland since 1999. In that time I’ve eaten a lot of Irish brown bread and Irish soda bread. Eric’s uncle in Limerick was once a bread man, so over the years, we’ve eaten great Irish bread. When visiting the Dingle Cookery School we finally learned how to make Irish brown bread. Here, we share our traditional brown bread recipe. It’s not as difficult as one might think. If I can do it, so can you! What is Traditional Irish Brown Bread? There are two primary types of Irish bread that people are familiar with: Irish soda bread and Irish brown bread. Traditional Irish brown bread is the darker, more dense sister of the of soda bread. They are both what are considered “quick breads.” One of the benefits of Irish brown bread is that it doesn’t require yeast. That means there is no need to wait for it to rise. You can mix the Irish brown bread dough, and put it in the oven. Irish brown bread is heavy and dense, more so than Irish soda bread. Irish soda bread is a white bread. Both taste great with warm Irish butter. They are both staples of the Irish diet, even today. To me, the best Irish brown bread is served as a thick slice, still slightly warm, with Irish butter on the side. Even better? It is served alongside a perfect cup of Irish seafood chowder, which allows me to dunk the crust into the chowder. How to Make Irish Brown Bread The reason why I chose to share the Irish brown bread recipe is, in part, because...
What to Eat in Mauritius – Searching for the Best Mauritius Food

What to Eat in Mauritius – Searching for the Best Mauritius Food

Before traveling to Mauritius, I really didn’t know much about the island, or Mauritian cuisine. I made some assumptions (many of them wrong) but I was pleasantly surprised at the varied of foods to eat in Mauritius. And, during our time in Mauritius, I was excited to learn so much about Mauritius food. In this post, I share our recommendations on what to eat in Mauritius. What To Eat in Mauritius The food in Mauritius was entirely a surprise. Mauritius island is a melting pot, with a unique combination of African, Indian, Chinese, French, and British influence. The Brits probably have the least direct influence on the cuisine, although tea is very popular. This melting pot influence means you can eat curry, dim sum, and a Chateaubriand all in one day. Or, some Mauritian dishes combine the influence from these varied cuisines into one dish, a Creole-inspired dish. The Mauritius language and religion is a mix of all of these influences, melting together, as is the Mauritius traditional food. We ate some of these Mauritius dishes on a great Mauritian food tour, but others we were able to eat at one of the top Mauritius hotels, the Heritage Le Telfair, as well. It was a perfect mix of the best places to eat in Mauritius, from Mauritius street food to luxury places to eat in Mauritius, with a side of Mauritius rum! Learn About What To Do in Mauritius – Travel Blog Mauritius Top 8 Things To Eat in Mauritius The Mauritian food was a surprise. But, in the time we left Mauritius, I’ve been thinking about the food of...
What is Formaggio di Fossa? Learning About Cave Cheese in Italy

What is Formaggio di Fossa? Learning About Cave Cheese in Italy

Fans of cheese generally travel to Emilia Romagna, Italy, to taste the King of Cheese. They may hope to learn about Parmigiano Reggiano and assume they will taste ricotta, and probably other types of Italian cheese. Only true cheese aficionados travel to Emilia Romagna to learn about formaggio di fossa, or cave cheese. How many people have even heard of cave cheese or could answer the question: “What is cave aged cheese?” What is Cave Aged Cheese?  At its most simple, this is cheese aged in a cave. There is more to it than that, though. Certainly, folks in Emilia Romagna, Italy, know formaggio di fossa, and maybe Italians, in general, know about cave cheese. But, this is a foodie find. Something only hard core Italian food lovers will know about or search for. Because of its rarity, I knew that tracking down cave cheese in Emilia Romagna was a must do. This experience was like something you’d see Anthony Bourdain talk about, or even better, Andrew Zimmern because as far as cheese goes, this is certainly a Bizarre Food.  There are several towns in Romagna that are known for cheese stored in caves. There are also other places known for cave aged cheese, including French cave cheese. Here we will focus on learning about the history of cave aged cheese in Italy and how to taste it. Visiting Fossa Pellegrini After a long morning tasting Italian wines with Helena from Yummy Italy, we started making our way to the village of Sogliano, high in the hills of Romagna. We were southeast of Bologna, and northeast of Florence, almost to Rimini and...