The Best Guinness in Limerick – 2017

The Best Guinness in Limerick – 2017

Two years ago I wrote my first blog post that announced, in my opinion, where one could find the best pint of Guinness in Limerick. At the time, and over the last 2 years, this post, not surprisingly, caused a bit of controversy in the Limerick community. Since that first post, we’ve been to Limerick a few more times. We tried more pints and tested out more pubs. I thought it about time I update my original post. Now, for 2017, here is where to find the best Guinness in Limerick. 2015 Results For The Best Guinness in Limerick Before sharing some of the new pubs we’ve discovered over the last 2 years, here’s a look back at our findings from 2015. As I noted back then, I love my Guinness. I’ve been told what makes a good Guinness. It has to do with the length of the draw, or the length of the tube that moves the Guinness from the keg to the tap. It also has to do with how clean the draw is. Occasionally, I do taste a Guinness that is a little strange (particularly outside of Ireland). But, I’m no expert. Although with the number of pints I’ve drank over the last 15+ years you would think I would be an expert. What makes the best Guinness in Limerick, then, if I am a self proclaimed non-expert? The atmosphere of the pub, the story of the pub, and the people we are with. Because, as much as pouring a good pint of Guinness is important, many people head to the pub for the craic, or the conversation....
Episode S02E03: Pints of Guinness at Fennessy’s Limerick

Episode S02E03: Pints of Guinness at Fennessy’s Limerick

The Best Pint of Guinness? Fennessy’s Limerick! During our month in Limerick last year, we put in a lot of blood, sweat, and tears in, researching what pub pours the best pint of Guinness in Limerick. Let’s just say, we weren’t surprised when it caused a bit of controversy, not just in Limerick, but throughout Ireland, and even abroad. The Irish take their Guinness pretty seriously. Since that last visit, we’ve been courted by some pubs in Limerick, who swore that they had the best pint of Guinness in Limerick, and we needed to give them a try. We received Facebook messages and tweets. But, only one pub sent us a photo of a pint of Guinness has a Christmas present, letting us know they were thinking of us. It was Matthew Fennessy’s Limerick. This obviously put them at the very top of the must-try list! When we arrived in Limerick, how could we pass up the opportunity to do just a little more research. So, on a rainy Limerick afternoon, we trekked across the city to meet up with Dara at Fennessy’s Limerick. Dara, a fourth generation pub owner told us some amazing stories about the history of his family, and of Fennessy’s, and we talked about what it takes to pour the perfect pint of Guinness. Not only is this a great episode to listen to if you are heading to Ireland, but it is also one for people who love Guinness, and history! Follow Fennessy’s on Facebook! Mentions in this Episode of our Food Travel Podcast Fennessy’s Pub Limerick Subscribe on iTunes! Subscribe to the With...
Best Foods to Eat in Europe in 2016

Best Foods to Eat in Europe in 2016

Like I mentioned in my last food porn post on where to eat in Asia in 2016, we ate a lot of amazing food in 2015. I wish I could share photos of all of them, and encourage people to search for all those dishes during their upcoming travels. Instead, I’ve come up with a list of the absolute BEST foods to eat in Europe in 2016. Okay, so maybe we didn’t eat all the food in Europe during 2015, but we ate a good many fabulous meals. Enough that I can put together a pretty good roadmap of what to eat in Europe. These dishes tend to focus on Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Ireland, because that is where we spent most of our time in 2015. Check out Episode 4 of our Travel Podcast It’s a Wrap – Europe! It’s true that food in Europe can be more expensive than in Asia. But, these dishes can be found at every price point. We had the chance to taste some dishes at the best restaurant in the world, where a meal for two will cost 600 Euros! And we ate some fabulous pork sandwiches that cost a couple of dollars. Most of our meals fell somewhere in between. And, instead of just sharing my photos of the dishes to eat in Europe, I am actually sharing links to the With Husband In Tow Instagram account. I am doing this not only to encourage you to check out all our food photos on Instagram (there’s a lot, and they are yummy), but also because the Instagram photos include links to the restaurants and locations...
How to Make Irish Brown Bread

How to Make Irish Brown Bread

I don’t believe I’ve ever shared a recipe before. But, when we learned how to make Irish brown bread during a class at the Dingle Cookery School, I have to say, I needed to share the recipe. I hope Chef Mark doesn’t mind. The reason why I chose to share the Irish brown bread recipe is, in part, because I’ve always been afraid to try baking my own bread. That said, I love warm and fresh bread. After falling in love with the Irish soda bread at the Beech Hill Hotel in Derry, I found myself determined to learn how to make it. I felt that it was important, as someone of Irish heritage, to learn how to make Irish brown bread. Well, my determination failed me while staying with family. Days wore on, and I had yet to attempt to bake anything other than a box of Betty Crocker brownies (they were tasty though). When Chef Mark placed the Dingle Cookery School recipe book in front of me, and I first saw the Traditional Brown Bread Recipe, I started grinning from ear to ear. Once I learned how easy it was to make, I knew I had to share this bit of traditional Irish food. Irish Brown Bread Ingredients -300g brown flour -200g plain white flour -80g oatflakes -tablespoon of bread soda (baking soda or bicarbonate) -300-360 ml of buttermilk -pinch of salt Making Irish Brown Bread I absolutely love recipes that start with “mix all dry ingredients together.” Done. Simple. Next step. Add the buttermilk until it reaches a stiff porridge consistency. Place the Irish brown bread dough...
7 Must Eat Northern Ireland Dishes

7 Must Eat Northern Ireland Dishes

When we arrived in Belfast, after six weeks eating Spanish food, we immediately found ourselves immersed in comfort food. But, not the kind of comfort food you might imagine during a trip to taste the best Northern Ireland dishes. We scouted out all of the ethnic food we could find in Belfast, like we do in many large cities. And, after three days of Chinese food, burritos, dim sum, and even American BBQ, we got serious about trying to find the more typical Northern Ireland dishes. Some of the foods are ones that I have become accustomed to during our travels in the south of Ireland, but a few were very specific to Northern Ireland. Irish Fry Normally, my ideal breakfast involves some fresh fruit, yogurt with muesli, maybe some toast or a bagel. Often it means a bowl of cereal. But, when we land in Ireland, it means a fry. During our time in Northern Ireland we ate numerous large breakfast plates – more so than normal. Each place we stayed included a fry as a breakfast option. The fry is a large plate of breakfast goodies and quickly became one of my favorite foods to eat in Northern Ireland. A fried egg surrounded by Irish pork sausage, rashers (a type of bacon), black and white pudding, and often beans or a grilled tomato half, along with toast and butter. Different from the fry we are used to in the South, the Northern Ireland version included two fried bits that we never tasted before. The first was a fried piece of bread, which was pretty nice to eat...
Traditional Irish Cooking at the Dingle Cookery School

Traditional Irish Cooking at the Dingle Cookery School

We braved the rainy afternoon weather as we pulled up into the driveway of the Dingle Cookery School. Once inside, it was toasty warm. Chef Mark, who runs the school, greeted us just as warmly. He immediately served some hot tea and fresh oatmeal bars as he launched into his discussion of traditional Irish cooking. And this is what I was most interested in during our visit to the Dingle Cookery School. After all, the word cookery, to me, symbolizes fancy cooking. But, traditional Irish cooking, in my experience, is, well, just that, traditional. It’s Aunt Theresa’s cooking. It’s roast beef and potatoes. Fish and chips. It’s really anything that involves a meat and at least one potato. In fact, the Irish family was also intrigued to learn what we would be cooking during our traditional Irish cooking class. I was expected to report back. Dingle Cookery School – Tradition and Basics As someone of Irish heritage, there are times where I feel like I know so little about Irish history. This was true before we toured Northern Ireland. It was also true as Chef Mark condensed thousands of years of Irish history, and more interesting Irish food history, into about thirty minutes. It was all the more impressive because he was demo cooking at the same time. He walked through the Druids, the Vikings, the British, the Spanish, and what was most interesting me – the focus on very local ingredients, and a renaissance of artisan food producers. After our history lesson, though, we got to work, on the basics. It’s important to Chef Mark to not only...
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