Where To Eat in Europe in 2017

Where To Eat in Europe in 2017

It’s mid January, and we have virtually none of our 2017 travel plans in place. That is a little unusual for us. We know we are flying to Berlin in March, and will be eating our way through Costa Brava again in April. But, other than that, things are pretty up in the air. I do know we need a little break from Bangkok. I’ve been dreaming about European food and wine, and part of our planning seems to be focused on where to eat in Europe in 2017. I found this infographic about where to travel in Europe in 2017. Although this list is for overall travel, HomeToGo also had a specific list on where to travel to eat in Europe in 2017 as well. I was surprised at how similar their list was to the cities I would like to travel to this year.  Our Top 5 Cities to Eat in Europe in 2017 Barcelona and Catalunya We love Barcelona! It’s one of our favorites cities to visit, and has been for years. We love exploring the tapas bars, and drinking cava at adorable little champagne bars. But, there are loads of fabulous places to eat in Catalunya as well. Just one of the areas of Catalunya worth exploring is Costa Brava, which runs north from Girona to the French border. Luckily, we will be returning to Costa Brava this April, for an entire month of drinking Emporda wine and eating Catalan seafood. We can’t wait! Bologna and Emilia Romagna It’s no secret that we love traveling and eating in Emilia Romagna, the Italian region that includes Bologna, Modena, Parma,...
Where To Find the Best Food in Charleston

Where To Find the Best Food in Charleston

The last stop on our culinary road trip across the U.S. south landed us in Charleston, South Carolina. One of the American cities that was always on the top of my list of places I wanted to visit. I never thought that we would be ending such an amazing road trip in Charleston. And, I never thought we would do it by eating some of the best food in Charleston. Best Food in Charleston – Halls Chophouse Gospel Brunch We woke up early in Athens, Georgia and raced to Charleston. We had a deadline: to partake in a Charleston, low country tradition, Sunday Gospel Brunch at historic Halls Chophouse. Halls is a family-run restaurant, with a focus on service and hospitality. We saw it first hand when a member of the Hall family held the door open for us as we entered. Halls was hopping. Every table filled to max capacity. The Gospel choir sat just inside the front door. Just after we stepped in, they broke out into When The Saints Go Marching In. It doesn’t get more Gospel than that. Because we raced to Charleston, and the atmosphere inside Halls was electric, I felt a little on edge. That feeling quickly abated after I started in on one of their famous Bloody Mary’s, complete with pickled okra and a crisp, cool shrimp. Brunch was on. Halls Chophouse is not only known for steaks, and their Bloody Mary’s, but for classic low country cuisine. Low country cuisine is the phrase used for the dishes traditionally served in South Carolina, and along the Georgia coast. It is heavily influenced by...
Top Foods You Must Eat in China

Top Foods You Must Eat in China

Because we recently ate loads of tasty foods in Chengdu, I asked our friends Agnes and Cez, China experts, to share their recommendations for foods you must eat in China. Agnes and Cez are typical foodies who love to discover new flavors when traveling across the world. Living and teaching English in China on and off since 2011, they managed to try a great variety of traditional Chinese dishes. They share their culinary experiences on their travel (eTramping) and food (Run Agness Run) blogs. Check them out if you are looking for some food inspiration! Unique Flavors of Chinese Food There’s a reason why Chinese food is so popular among worldwide travelers and locals. Chinese cuisine is, above all, extremely tasty, aromatic and very colorful. It is also diverse as you can find extremely spicy meals in the Eastern part of the country, sweet in the South, salty in the North, and West is characterized by its sourness. In this way, everyone can find something for themselves when visiting different parts of China. Cez enjoying his jiaozi – traditional Chinese dumplings. Additionally, dining out in China is very affordable so you can eat more and pay less. Superior restaurants are much cheaper than you think, whereas the street food costs nearly nothing! Agness ready to try some fried pork with rice and veggies. Since we know that Chinese cuisine is worth tasting, let’s check out some of the top dishes you must eat in China when visiting the Land of Dragons. Top Foods You Must Eat in China Sweet and Sour Chicken in Batter This dish is a perfect dinner option as it...
What to Eat in Chengdu

What to Eat in Chengdu

What to Eat in Chengdu When we left China after our first trip in 2009, I was in no rush to return. China is hard. Even traveling in major cities like Shanghai and Beijing, or to tourist destinations like Xi’an, we had a hard time finding English menus and English speakers. We got scammed. I swore I would not return to China for quite some time. The only exception: traveling to Sichuan provence, to eat in Chengdu. I knew Chengdu only as the land of the panda bears. And, I always wanted to visit Chengdu specifically for the pandas. But, honestly, I had no idea where Chengdu was, or that it was at the epicenter of Sichuan provence, home to spicy food and lip numbing dishes. I knew I wanted to travel to Sichuan, I just needed to figure out what to eat in Chengdu. What is Sichuan Pepper? Sichuan cuisine has a characteristic red color, and is often loaded with dried chilis. Generally, it is easy to assume these dried chili peppers are Sichuan peppers. But, they are really just dried chilis. Although they are added to the oil to cook the dishes, they don’t generally get eaten. Sichuan peppers, on the other hand, are more like a dried berry, from a particular type of ash tree. They are closer to black peppercorns than they are chili peppers. It is this ingredient that causes the lip numbing that comes after a few bites of Sichuan food. Am I crazy for actually wanting to eat in Chengdu specifically to experience the tingle on the lips? There is more to Sichuan...
Portuguese Food Travel Cookbook

Portuguese Food Travel Cookbook

I sometimes am still amazed at how long it took us to take our first trip to Portugal. We traveled all over Europe before finally venturing west enough to land in Lisbon. Since that time we continue to explore the country, mainly for Portuguese food! When our friend Nelson, a Portuguese travel blogger, sent us a signed copy of his Portuguese Travel Cookbook, I was thrilled. Then, I was jealous. And, I kind of hated him. Let me tell you why. The Portuguese Travel Cookbook Nelson’s Portuguese food cookbook is not a  typical cookbook. Instead, it’s a travel cookbook. It provides more than merely recipes, it tells the stories behind the recipes. It uses recipes to encourage people to not only travel to Portugal, but to explore its rich culinary history. For such a petite country, there is a diversity of cuisine unlike many other countries. The variety of fish and seafood from the coast. The variety of sausages that are different in the cities than in the country, differing from the north to the south. Don’t get me started on the Portuguese wine. And, Nelson is the perfect person to be a host on this culinary journey. A native of Portugal, he grew up eating his grandmother’s cooking. The first recipe of the book is his grandmother’s farmer’s soup. From there, the book continues through the sea, the land, and more to offer the best of Portuguese food heritage. All of this along with stunning photographs that certainly inspire one to travel to Portugal. This is why I was thrilled to see the book finally in print. Cooking Portuguese...
A French Cooking Class – Baking Pastry in Lyon

A French Cooking Class – Baking Pastry in Lyon

I’m the farthest thing from a connoisseur of French food. I know the basics, enough to get me through a few weeks of traveling in France. But, when I walked into a French cooking class, with a group of bloggers, and learned I would be helping to make pâte à choux, my first reaction was “what the heck is that?” What is Pâte à Choux It was a bit chaotic when our group walked into the small demo kitchen just off of Place Bellecour in the heart of Lyon. We were traveling together on our Viking River Cruise. This was the last full day of our trip, and we had gotten to know each other pretty well. Perhaps too well. As we put on our aprons, and all wondered where to put the dozen or so cameras that joined us in our class, our instructor started speaking, very fast. It was all a bit confusing as to what was going to happen. Our instructor handed us a sheet up paper with the ingredients and steps to make pâte à choux. I slunk off to a corner to Google pâte à choux, not wanting to admit that, as the food blogger of the group, I had no idea what we were about to make. The choux part of the name is merely the light and fluffy pastry dough that is used to make loads of different French pastries, like eclairs and profiteroles. Okay, now I started to feel more in my comfort zone. In this case, we learned to make the pastry, the crumbly part on the top, and Chantilly cream for the inside,...
Do You Eat? Then Get Your FREE COPY of 37 Must Eat Foods in Southeast Asia!

Do you love to eat?

Don't miss a tasty morsel. Subscribe and receive a FREE eBook "37 Must Eat Foods in Southeast Asia"

You have Successfully Subscribed!